Arts » Visual Art

On View This Week

Opus Gallery

All Women All Art. Opus Gallery's annual all-women art show gives female artists the opportunity to display their creations in all media. Gallery owner Margarita Shuster says she created the show 17 years ago to help correct women's minority status in the creative world. "I read about women and art in the U.S., and it was not a very powerful position," she says. "We started this so women could show off their creativity." Participants include painter Inna Barkon, jeweler Maureen Bergman, and print artist Maria A. Zanetta. An opening reception will be held Saturday, August 4, from 4 to 9 p.m. The show continues through September 10 at 27629 Chagrin Blvd., Woodmere. Call 216-595-1376 or go to

Artists Archives of the Western Reserve : Craft Exhibition. Retired CIA President David Deming curates this group exhibition that displays a wide variety of media, including pottery, wearables, glass, and fiber art. Participants include jeweler Catherine Butler, sculptor Stephanie Craig, ceramicist Richard Schneider, and painter Elise Newman. An opening reception will be held Friday, August 3, from 5 to 8 p.m. Through August 31 at 1834 East 123rd St. Call 216-721-9020 or go to

Corcoran Fine Arts:Ostensible Grounds. Painter Eileen Dorsey creates impasto landscapes of Ireland, Canada, and the American West full of depth and wonder. An artist's reception will be held August 3 from 5 to 9 p.m. at 12610 Larchmere Blvd. Through August 30. Call 216-767-0770 or go to

Convivium33 Gallery: The Battle We Didn't Choose: My Wife's Fight With Breast Cancer. A photo-documentary by Manhattan-based photographer Angelo Merendino, this moving exhibit conveys the courage and unrelenting honesty of its subject. Through August 26 at 1433 East 33rd St. Call 216-881-7838 or go to for more information.

Heights Arts: Living Room. This show assembles top regional talent to help make the entirety of the living room (not just the walls) a showcase for fine art. Contributors to the exhibition include furniture artist Doug Meyer, and ironworker and Creative Workforce Fellow Stephen Yusko. Through September 1 at 2175 Lee Rd., Cleveland Heights. Call 216-371-3457 or go to

Local Girl Gallery: Ordinary/Beautiful. Brook Figer paints still lifes and images of birds surreally perched on ornate trappings. Photographer Craig Brown turns his lens to the

garden, producing close-ups of everything from polished produce to invading snails. Through August 31 at 16106 Detroit Ave., Lakewood. Call 216-228-1802 or go to

Loren Naji Studio: TALL WALLS unjuried uncensored. Loren Naji shares his studio walls with anyone who wants to use them, from well-known local artists like Melinda Placko and Mona Gazala to folks who wander in off the street. Unjuried and uncensored, the show promises plenty of fun and offense. An opening reception will be held Friday, August 3, from 5:30 p.m. to midnight. Through mid-August at 2138 West 25th St. Call 216-621-6644 or visit Loren Naji Studio Gallery on Facebook.

The Morgan Conservatory: A Thousand Stairs. CSU professor Qian Li uses painting, mixed media, and her first endeavors in printmaking to explore the cyclical influence of culture on individual decisions, and vice versa. Also: In-between. Don Lisy mixes and matches paint, charcoal, and pastels with paper, canvas, and wood to create allegorical self-portraits. Through August 25 at 1754 East 47th St. Call 216-361-9255 or go to

River Gallery Art: Jeff Yost and Brian Sarama. Jeff Yost recalls the Impressionists with his misty landscapes. But while the French tradition gloried in blinding light, Yost calls forms out of dusky gloom. Recent MFA grad Brian Sarama breaks down images and piles them on top of one another on ceramic backdrops, creating fields of color and shapes. Through September 8 at 19046 Old Detroit Rd., Rocky River. Call 440-331-8406 or go to

Rotten Meat Gallery: Solo Show II: Compilation. Melanie Newman, a 2007 CIA grad, displays work from a short but varied career that has produced sculpture, photography, tapestry, and printmaking. If any theme unites the work, it is concern for life lived in the region. "My work is heavily informed by my upbringing in the Cleveland area [and the] constant observation of a struggling urban environment," says Newman. An opening reception will be held Friday, August 3, from 6 to 10 p.m. Through August 31 at 1814 East 40th St., Suite 4B. Call 216-469-4896 or visit Rotten Meat Gallery on Facebook.

Zygote Press: In-Turn: Divided Attentions. Artists selected for their service in keeping up the day-to-day operations of cultural institutions like MOCA, Spaces, CIA, and the Cleveland Clinic's collections display pieces representing the succession of uncertainties that make up many creatives' lives. The exhibition continues through August 11 at 1410 East 30th St. For more information, call 216-621-2900 or go to

Clara Fritzsche Library at Notre Dame College: A Natural Point of View. Mardel Sanzotta's light, bright natural scenes aim to charm with their intensely detailed images of expressive animal subjects. Through August 31 at 4545 College Rd. in South Euclid. Call 216-373-5267.

Arts Collinwood: Echo. Recent CIA grads Steve Basel and Kyle Dean Todaro use styles inspired by Courbet and Manet to represent modern life. Torado's fractured images graft together slices of dissimilar scenes, where figures undergo different lighting, mood, and tensions. They are meant to invoke the episodic, jittery character of plugged-in postmodern life. Basel's work does not always show subjects alone, but they are always lonely. Through August 5 at 15605 Waterloo Rd. Call 216-692-9500 or go to Gathering Place: Recovery. Cleveland native and Boston resident Willard Traub displays the photography he took to keep his sense of agency during his ordeal with blood cancer. Silver gelatin images of caretakers, the changing seasons, and a steadfast dog are accompanied by brief reflections in prose and poetry. "I hope people go," says Traub of the exhibition, "especially those afflicted with illness, and realize they can turn around and use some of the strengths they have to help heal themselves." Through September 28 at 23300 Commerce Park, Beachwood. Call 216-595-9546 or go to

Loren Naji Studio Gallery: PRIMAL. Loren Naji presents a series of works inspired by the spontaneity of first drafts scribbled on sketchbooks or coffeehouse napkins. Also on display: works by artists including Jamie Hart, Deb Lawrence, Matt Dibble, Dana Depew, and Douglas Max Utter. Through July 20 at 2138 West 25th St. Call 216-621-6644, go to, or visit Loren Naji Studio Gallery on Facebook. Proximity: Tectonics. Cleveland native Paul Yanko draws on the imagery of geometric abstraction and commercial design, using techniques borrowed from painting, drawing, and collage to create dense patterns meant to project outward from the two dimensions that contain them. The exhibition continues through September 1 at 1667 E. 40th St. For more information, call 216-262-8903 or go to

Rotten Meat Gallery: Life in Death. Rock photographer Keith Marlowe turns his lens to the impoverished of the Philippines, whose life is a quiet but constant struggle against death. Through July 28 at 1814 East 40th St., Suite 4B. Call 216-469-4896 or visit Rotten Meat on Facebook.

Willoughby Hills Community Center Art Gallery: New Print Topographies. Artists from Zygote Press — including Liz Maugans, Denise Stewart, Elizabeth Emery and Lisa Schonberg — display printmaking and design work. Through September 3 at 35400 Chardon Rd., Willoughby Hills. Call 440-918-8730 or go to

William Rupnik Gallery: Fort. In a series of mixed-media work and conceptual installations, Paul Sydorenko recalls his first, and possibly last, pure experience of freedom in a desiccated childhood fort. Through August 3 at 1117 Euclid Ave. Call 216-533-5575 or go to

Tregoning and Company: Red Hot. Marking 30 years of operations, Tregoning displays works by the first-generation abstract expressionist James Johnson (1925-1963). Through August 31 at 1300 West 78 St. Call 216-281-8626 or go to

William Busta Gallery: Superposition. Barbara Polster's sculpture and video installations abstractly represent a moment of motion frozen in time, challenging the viewer to wonder where the depicted subject is going, from where it came, and what the driving force may be. Through July 31 at 2731 Prospect Ave. Call 216-298-9071 or go to

1point618 Gallery: Recent Works. Painter of simulacra Royden Watson painstakingly reproduces surfaces like wallpaper and plywood that are indistinguishable from the real thing at all but the closest inspection. His recreation of the materials we take for granted all around us are meant to make us newly aware of our place in the economy and environment. Through July 22 at 6421 Detroit Ave. Call 216-281-1618 or go to

Log Cabin Gallery: Nature's Way. More than 20 artists in media as diverse as painting, pottery, rug-weaving, printmaking, and origami contribute to this celebration of summertime. Through July 29 at 1671 Main St., Peninsula. Call 330-657-2670 or go to

Survival Kit: Character Split.A rtist Tyler Zeleny uses images of human-animal hybrids to craft a modern myth dramatizing and condemning consumer culture. Austin-based Clarke Curtis' elaborately detailed prints look like illustrations from unpublishable children's books. Through August 17 at 1305 West 80th St., Suite 303. Call 216-533-4885 or go to

Gallery at the Old Stone Church: The Left Handed Line of Mike Guyot. Local draftsman and "architectural impressionist" Mike Guyot translates his response to the Cleveland skyline and street scenes through freehand pen and ink drawings. An artist's reception will be held June 21 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Through August 28 at 1380 Ontario St. Call 216-241-6145 or go to

Loren Naji Studio and Gallery: Celebrate Cleveland. Photographer Victoria Miller and graphic artist Rick Novario exhibit digitally altered views of our industrial city along with works by Michael Nekic. Also: Beautiful Possibility. Current Spaces artist-in-residence Alison Pebworth brings her cross-country tour to Cleveland, with interactive exhibits that explore what it means to be an American. Both shows are open through June 23 at 2138 West 25th St.; call 216-621-6644 or go to

Peninsula Art Academy: Fourth Annual Plein Air Competition. Friday June 15 through Sunday June 17, area artists will paint outdoors at locations throughout Peninsula and the national park, taking inspiration from nature. Featured works will be moved to the Peninsula Art Academy for display through August 11 at 1600 West Mill St. East, Peninsula. Call 330-657-2248 or go to

Sculpture Center: Stirring Waters/Between Two Bodies. Ten Boston artists join 13 from Ohio. Peter Haines invokes the primeval with monolithic bronzes in deceptively simple shapes, like hunter-gatherer carvings. Hannah Verlin infuses humor into her mass construction of simple figures that form sets greater than the sum of their parts. Through July 14 at 1834 East 123 St. Call 216-229-6527 or go to

Wasmer Gallery at Ursuline College: The First Earth Show — Part 3. Cleveland artists Debra Sue Solecki and Paul Newsome and Californian Martin Kanton pay tribute to the planet, with works that employ natural materials like clay, metal, and raw pigment. Through July 27 at Ursuline College, 2550 Lander Rd., Pepper Pike. Go to


Add a comment