Celebrating Opening Day with the Cleveland Memory Project

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That there is Lou Boudreau and Bill Veeck in the parade through downtown Cleveland celebrating the 1948 world championship. It comes from the Cleveland Memory Project, a glorious repository of photos by the Cleveland Press that were donated to CSU.

I dug through and found a lot of cool Tribe photos, which you can enjoy after the jump.

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That's the crowds outside the gate during the 1948 World Series.

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Homemade Indians aprons.

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Ten-cent beer night, of course.

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The "Baseball Bug" mascot in 1981, which I've never, ever heard of before.

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Larry Doby and Dale Mitchell in the 1948 parade.

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Leaving the field after winning the final game of the World Series in 1948.

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Player/Manager Frank Robinson being greeted by player John Lowenstein (who looks kinda strange, no?) after hitting a home run in his first at-bat on Opening Day of 1975.

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Hank Greenburg and Joe Gordon with Johnny Mize, being haunted by "Chief White Mountain Lion." If you search for that name, the caption on this photo in the Memory Project archives is literally the only place it comes up. Was this an official mascot?

Description, according to the site: " "[illegible] MIZE (CENTER), FIRST BASEMAN OF THE NEW YORK GIANTS, IS A WILLING SUBJECT AS CHIEF WHITE MOUNTAIN LION DEMONSTRATES GENUINE INDIAN SCALPING TECHNIQUE. ENJOYING THE LESSON ARE TWO CLEVELAND INDIANS, HANK GREENBERG (LEFT) AND JOE GORDON. THE GIANTS AND INDIANS ARE CURRENTLY ENGAGED IN AN EXHIBITION SERIES IN PHOENIX."

You know, you just don't get enough demonstrations of genuine scalping techniques at the ballpark these days.

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