What to Do Tonight: Dokken

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Dokken came out of Chicago in 1983 with Breaking the Chains, which established wailing singer Don Dokken and hard-rocking guitarist George Lynch as major metal players. Cut from the same musical cloth as the Scorpions and Blue Öyster Cult, Dokken relentlessly played the arena-rock circuit and delivered platinum hits like 1985’s Under Lock and Key. But the band called it quits in 1989, a couple of years before Nirvana would have made it obsolete anyway. Dokken reformed in the mid-’90s and have been on a roller-coaster ride since (Lynch left the group, and the rhythm section was completely restructured). The band’s latest album, 2008’s Lightning Strikes Again, is a halfhearted attempt to return to its former glory. L.A. Guns, Trixter, and Danger Danger round out the ’80s-oriented lineup part of today’s Great American Rib Cook Off & Music Festival. The show starts at 7 p.m. at Time Warner Amphitheater at Tower City. Tickets range from $8 to $25. —Jeff Niesel

Review the show at clevescene.com/concertscene

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