What to Do Tonight: Lynyrd Skynyrd and Bret Michaels

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Lynyrd Skynyrd: Now performing in vacant houses
  • Lynyrd Skynyrd: Now performing in vacant houses

This is one of rock ’n’ roll’s bigger swindles. Lynyrd Skynyrd’s frontman, Ronnie Van Zant, died in a 1977 plane crash. After a ten-year hiatus, a group of guys remotely connected to the original group (guitarist Gary Rossington is the only founding member still in the band) reunited with Van Zant’s younger brother Johnny taking over vocal. They’ve been touring and recording as Lynyrd Skynyrd ever since — something that smacks of a scam, even at a time when classic-rock bands like Foreigner and Journey are on the road with replacement players. Skynyrd, after all, was Ronnie’s vision. Even guitarist Steve Gaines — who died in the tragic accident and played on only one album, 1977’s Street Survivors — added newfound swagger to songs like “That Smell” and “What’s Your Name.” It’s telling that when Lynyrd Skynyrd was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2006, no post-crash members were included. The band shares headlining duties with Poison’s Bret Michaels, who just released a solo album, Custom Built. The two rock heavyweights, with .38 Special, play Blossom at 7 p.m. Tickets are $45.50-$65.50. Call 330-920-8040 or go to livenation.com.—Jeff Niesel

Review the show at clevescene.com/concertscene

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