What to Do Tonight: Sublime With Rome

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Sublime: now heroin-free (we think)
  • Sublime: now heroin-free (we think)

Besides No Doubt, Sublime are the most successful band to come out of the SoCal ska revival of the ’90s. But they never had a chance to go on tour with their breakthrough self-titled album from 1996 because frontman Bradley Nowell died of a heroin overdose two months before the record was released. But like INXS, the Doors, and countless other groups before them, Sublime are back on the road with a new singer — in this case, 22-year-old Rome Ramirez (yes, he was eight years old when “What I Got” and “Santeria” were played on the radio for the first time). Nowell was the architect behind the band’s seamless blend of reggae, punk, hip-hop, and pop, so Ramirez has some pretty big shoes to fill. If you ask Nowell’s estate, he can’t fill them. Because of a court ruling, the trio has to call itself Sublime With Rome (sounds like an awkwardly named travel campaign, doesn’t it?). Still, bassist Eric Wilson and drummer Bud Gaugh were a killer rhythm section back in the day. So maybe we should trust their decision. Sublime With Rome, with Dirty Heads, play Time Warner Cable Amphitheater at 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $32; call 216-522-4822. —Matt Whelihan

Going to the show? Let us know what you think of it in the comments.

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