Concert Review: El Ten Eleven at the Grog Shop

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El Ten Eleven double-necking it
  • El Ten Eleven double-necking it

El Ten Eleven headlined the Grog Shop last night, in the instrumental post-rock duo’s second appearance in Cleveland this year (they played the Beachland Tavern in April).

This time around, they gave a livelier performance. But the late starting time meant many people were gone before El Ten even got onstage.

Working a double-neck bass and guitar, Kristian Dunn often played both necks simultaneously. Dunn’s feet were projected on a center-stage screen busily stomping the myriad pedals that house each of his looping riffs, allowing the thin crowd to see how he stacks harmonies on top of counter melodies.

Drummer Tim Fogarty held it all together from the corner of the stage with his electronic-acoustic kit, popping out briefly to knock out a riff on Dunn’s bass with drum sticks.

El Ten ran through tunes from each of their three albums, with songs that range from introspective (“Lorge”) to dancey (“Jumping Frenchmen of Maine”).

They also debuted “Falling,” a track from It’s Still a Secret, due in November.

Also performing last night was Baths, the stage name of Will Wiesenfeld, who opened on the randomly-at-hand baby grand piano with a song I swear was about taking a bath, then quickly switched to a digital platform, during which Wiesenfeld stabbed and twisted a textbook-sized mixer to craft songs that sounded like up-tempo chillwave in the style of Matmos.

Following Baths was Martin Dosh, who sat alone among keyboards, a giant mixer, and a drum kit to orchestrate multi-layered post-rock compositions with a downbeat feel. Dosh’s two-bars-of-this, two-bars-of-that approach found him constantly switching instruments to carve out live samples, which he captured and looped to create complex, engaging songs. —Adam Burroughs

Did you go to the show? Let us know what you thought of it in the comments.

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