Film » Film Capsules

Amacord (Italy, 1973)

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At this point in his career, Federico Fellini could pretty much write his own ticket, and he did indeed, with a vivid immersion into fragmentary adolescent memories of a seaside Roman hometown (reminiscent of the filmmaker’s own Rimini) under Mussolini in the 1930s. The plot is basically a procession of affectionately outsized magical-realist vignettes, of Volpina, the village prostitute; of the smug, bullying Blackshirts; of school; of arguing parents and daffy family; of pubescent sexual awareness and awakening (see: Volpina, the village prostitute); of Catholic church ominously co-existing with a giant icon-like portrait of Il Duce fashioned from rose petals; of the children and citizens playing in a rare snowfall; of mentally ill Uncle Teo hiding up in a tree, naked, shouting “I want a wooooooooman!” It’s Fellini’s world, and we’re just privileged to live in it, at least while the projector whirrs. An Oscar winner for Best Foreign-Language Feature. Cleveland Institute of Art Cinematheque. At 7:20 p.m. Saturday, April 4, and 3:45 p.m. Sunday, April 5. HHHH

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