Arts » Arts Features

Arts News

by

comment

Artists are invited to submit their visions for public art to be included in an East Side Transit Center, a passenger waiting space/bus staging area to be located at East 22nd and Prospect. Public art will be an important part of the project, which will be named after the late Congresswoman Stephanie Tubbs Jones. Big walls, illuminated canopies and seating all offer opportunities for art, and there is space for sculpture, mosaic work and landscaping. The public-art budget is $138,000; budget for the entire project is $10.4 million. Artists can submit proposals until 4 p.m. April 6. To get the call-for-artist package, go to the Greater Cleveland RTA Website (riderta.com) and follow the menus from "business center" to "contract opportunities" to "public art." For information, call 216.566.5187 or e-mail artsintransit@gcrta.org.

The Bang and the Clatter's A Shot Rings Out Theatre (29 Maiden Lane, Akron) has extended its run of Michael Weller's play Fifty Words through March 28. Performances are at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, and 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $15. Call 330.606.5317.

The Ingenuity Festival, which blends art and technology, has announced an initial slate of artists for its fifth incarnation, which will take place July 10-12 - again at PlayhouseSquare, but in a different set of alleys and spaces. The top of the ticket so far is artist, musician and culture-jammer Mark Gunderson a.k.a. TradeMark G. He's known for founding the Evolution Control Committee, a band often credited with inventing "mashup music." It flirts with copyright violation and pushes the bounds of fair use by using found sounds to make new music; as a result, the ECC was the target of a cease-and-desist order from CBS for using samples of Dan Rather. The band's creative output has spanned the history of recording technology, with 16 full-length albums, a videotape, two 7-inch records, and even an 8-track tape and a wax cylinder recording. Also on the schedule is an opera by CIA professor Kasumi composed largely of verbal and visual samples. Ingenuity reports that last year's event presented 180 artists, attracted more than 35,000 people (a much more sober and probably more accurate number than previous years' estimates) and had an economic impact of $2 million. Go to ingenuitycleveland.com for updates.

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Cleveland Scene. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Cleveland Scene, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at news@clevescene.com.

Support Local Journalism.
Join the Cleveland Scene Press Club


Local journalism is information. Information is power. And we believe everyone deserves access to accurate independent coverage of their community and state. Our readers helped us continue this coverage in 2020, and we are so grateful for the support.


Help us keep this coverage going in 2021. Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing membership pledge, your support goes to local-based reporting from our small but mighty team.


Join the Cleveland Scene Press Club for as little as $5 a month.