Music » CD Reviews

CD Review: The Dodos

Time to Die (Frenchkiss)

comment

Pulsating syncopation and scattered rhythms have always been the cornerstones of the Dodos' strangely attractive music. Time to Die is no exception. Logan Kroeber's frenetic drumbeats guide the jagged fingerpicking of singer-guitarist Meric Long. This time, however, the duo adds a third member: Keaton Snyder laces electric vibraphone into many of the songs. The additional instrument doesn't change the Dodos' fundamental sound, but the songwriting has evolved. Last year's Visiter captured a visceral primitiveness, while Time to Die features a more polished, grander sound. This can partly be attributed to producer Phil Ek (Fleet Foxes, the Shins). Unfortunately, the vibrancy and urgency that make the Dodos a force of nature are missing from many of the songs. "Fables" sticks to a basic thump-a-thump-thump throb, and "Acorn Factory" is a pretty but forgettable tune. Textural energy still shines through on "This Is a Business," where feverish drumming builds and abruptly stops, only to come back to life furiously. Long's layered harmonies and classical guitar picking are still intriguing, but the band's missing arrhythmic pulse leaves something to be desired. — Danielle Sills

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Cleveland Scene. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Cleveland Scene, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at news@clevescene.com.

Support Local Journalism.
Join the Cleveland Scene Press Club


Local journalism is information. Information is power. And we believe everyone deserves access to accurate independent coverage of their community and state. Our readers helped us continue this coverage in 2020, and we are so grateful for the support.


Help us keep this coverage going in 2021. Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing membership pledge, your support goes to local-based reporting from our small but mighty team.


Join the Cleveland Scene Press Club for as little as $5 a month.