Music » Livewire

Charivari

Sunday, February 18, at the Beachland.

by

comment
Charivari
  • Charivari
A Cajun band from Louisiana, Charivari might be the best dance outfit in a notoriously danceable genre. The name comes from a word meaning "all-night party" -- specifically ones held outside the bedroom of a couple on their wedding night. Its appropriateness has been lost on few who have heard them get it on. Formerly called the Mamou Prairie Band, Charivari dropped its old name to avoid getting confused with other bands with Mamou in their titles (T-Mamou, the Mamou Playboys). The quintet, which released I Want to Dance With You -- its first album as Charivari -- last year, is fronted by fiddler Mitchell Reed, who compares to the likes of Dennis McGee, Canray Fontenot, and even Michael Doucet (of the world's most popular Cajun group, Beausoleil). The other longtime member is singer-guitarist Randy Vidrine, who sings all of Charivari's songs in Cajun-style French. They've been compared to Beausoleil, but Charivari is no clone. The comparisons come more because this is another Cajun band that could go far to make such an exotic music more accessible to folks beyond the Bayou State. These musicians have forged a sound that's all their own, and it's decidedly frenetic. Only two of the songs on the debut CD break the pattern of high energy Charivari establishes. It's get-down music of the first order.

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Cleveland Scene. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Cleveland Scene, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at news@clevescene.com.

Cleveland Scene works for you, and your support is essential.

Our small but mighty local team works tirelessly to bring you high-quality, uncensored news and cultural coverage of Cleveland and beyond.

Unlike many newspapers, ours is free – and we'd like to keep it that way, because we believe, now more than ever, everyone deserves access to accurate, independent coverage of their community.

Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing pledge, your support helps keep Cleveland's true free press free.