Music » CD Reviews

Cul de Sac

ECIM (Strange Attractors)

by

comment
Back in the early '90s, record store clerks generally filed Cul de Sac under "alternative." But the recent reissue of 1992's ECIM proves the New England quartet shared little in common with the punked-out alt-rock acts of the day. Far more eclectic, the nearly all-instrumental Cul De Sac embraced the mid-'70s krautrock of Can and Faust, surf music, hippie-trippy psychedelia, industrial, and the experimental folk of guitar icon John Fahey. With its distantly wailing slide guitar and galloping beat, the spaghetti-western-influenced "Electar" anticipates the windswept Americana of Calexico and Giant Sand, while the pulsating, motorik rush of opener "Death Kit Train" feels like a dream-team collaboration between the Ventures, Stereolab, and Pere Ubu. As for the occasional vocal track, Mission of Burma associate Dredd Foole transforms Tim Buckley's sublime ballad "Song to the Siren" into one surreal listen. Returning ECIM to circulation, Strange Attractors gives us a fabulous holiday gift.

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Cleveland Scene. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Cleveland Scene, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at news@clevescene.com.

Cleveland Scene works for you, and your support is essential.

Our small but mighty local team works tirelessly to bring you high-quality, uncensored news and cultural coverage of Cleveland and beyond.

Unlike many newspapers, ours is free – and we'd like to keep it that way, because we believe, now more than ever, everyone deserves access to accurate, independent coverage of their community.

Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing pledge, your support helps keep Cleveland's true free press free.