Music » Livewire

Damo Suzuki

With Cul De Sac. Monday, May 13, at the Grog Shop.

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One of the fathers of Krautrock, Damo Suzuki was the second and last vocalist to front Cologne, Germany's Can, one of the greatest rock ensembles of the 20th century. Can was psychedelic the way electric Miles Davis or the Velvet Underground was psychedelic, except it wasn't nearly as fascinated by the dark side. In its search for the holy light that pulsated within pan-global polyrhythms, Can was a lot like the Grateful Dead, another band with which it shared sonic space. Yet, unlike the Dead, it'd put a brick on the rhythmic gas pedal and proceed to endlessly smear sound colors on top, grooving like stanky, primordial demons. Herein, Suzuki did not sing so much as chatter above, his voice just another instrument adding to the beat chaos. Heavy, supple, and sweet, Can jammed and did not write songs -- what else would you expect from classically trained German hippies living in a house together, imbibing major doses of hallucinogens?

Every report confirms that this is the very energy Suzuki's recent live shows have been bent on re-creating. And in Boston's Cul de Sac, he's found kindred souls for the voyage: instrumental noisemongers capable of going the distance without succumbing to rest stops or pee breaks. In other words, getting there early and staying late is part of the fun!

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