Music » Livewire

God Forbid

With Walls of Jericho, Scarlet, and Black Dahlia Murder. Monday, March 8, at Peabody's.

by

comment
God Forbid
  • God Forbid
It's hard to imagine even the most skeptical metal fans fixating on God Forbid's demographics as much as the band itself does. The predominantly black modern thrashers -- granted, there's a phrase you don't hear every day -- play a mix of old-school shred and nü-school chug like they have something to prove.

Their latest, Gone Forever -- a collection of images of hopelessness and apocalypse (there's a novel metal motif) -- is a mere nine songs, most of them close to five minutes. Closing cut "Judge the Blood" (whatever the hell that's supposed to mean) tops out at the six-minute barrier, wedding Chimairian double-kick-bass rolls to singing guitar leads of the Iron Maiden variety.

"It's intriguing," guitarist Dallas Coyle says in the band's bio. "It's almost like we're cheating. Everyone in this band knows that we're good at what we do. But like a lot of people check us out because it's like a taboo. They think, 'Oh my God! They're black.' It's like Kittie being checked out because they are girls."

The reference to Kittie is remarkably appropriate. The barely legal teen she-beasts made a splash playing punked-up, eclectic metal -- then fell into the trap of shredding out very routine double-bass-kick-growl-repeat, apparently to show that they could rock just as hard as the über dudes that dominate the genre. God Forbid stumbles there too, but it does it well.

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Cleveland Scene. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Cleveland Scene, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at [email protected].

Support Local Journalism.
Join the Cleveland Scene Press Club


Local journalism is information. Information is power. And we believe everyone deserves access to accurate independent coverage of their community and state. Our readers helped us continue this coverage in 2020, and we are so grateful for the support.


Help us keep this coverage going in 2021. Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing membership pledge, your support goes to local-based reporting from our small but mighty team.


Join the Cleveland Scene Press Club for as little as $5 a month.