Music » Livewire

God Forbid

With Mnemic, Goatwhore, the Human Abstract, and Scar Symmetry. Thursday, January 11, at Peabody's.

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Recently on tour with big-shot Metallica clones Trivium, New Jersey's God Forbid churns out metalcore with just enough heaviness and vocal murk to invite friendly comparisons to the almighty Obituary. God Forbid just plays a whole lot faster, piling riffs on top of riffs, harmonizing leads like a Thin Lizzy cover band, and riddling songs with plenty of unholy breakdown stomps -- which is always fun. And hell, the band even has a futuristic concept album under its belt: 2005's IV: Constitution of Treason.

Then again, it's guitarist Doc Coyle who makes God Forbid's made-for-MTV metal something interesting; the guy can shred. And while shredding is no rarity amid metalcore's abundance of machine-gun guitarists, Coyle's solos immediately stand out, touching on Eddie, Yngwie, and even Judas Priest's K.K. Downing. God Forbid may be reaching for a larger audience, but at least it doesn't consist of know-nothing teenagers adding melodic choruses to its crunch.

Lyrically, an angry political subtext should make God Forbid's live show more than just a pummeling bruisefest, meaning you can get some real thinking done about how everything sucks and how to rise above it all. Or maybe just about how everything sucks.

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