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Gospel Truth

Celebrating black heritage, one jam at a time.

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More than 150 singers and instrumentalists from the Cleveland School of the Arts keep in tune with the city's top musicians from the Cleveland Institute of Music at the 17th annual Black Heritage Concert. The program will range from beloved spirituals and Hebrew psalms to a German requiem. "We've seen them wow audiences around the world in concert in places like Japan and around the country in major festivals and concerts," says Barbara Walton, the school's principal. "They can hold their own onstage."The show will also include works written by black composers, like "In the Spirit, in the Flesh" by Frederick Tillis and "Hold Fast to Your Dreams" by Roland Carter. "The main thing is the outstanding potential of these children performing these great works by these wonderful African American compositions that still don't get played by the big orchestras as much as they should," says William Woods, the band's director. "Many of these youngsters have had to overcome so much adversity to reach this point. I am so proud of what they can do, with all the changes they face." The concert starts at 4 this afternoon at the Cleveland Institute of Music's Kulas Hall, 11021 East Boulevard. Admission is free. Call 216-791-5000 or visit www.cim.edu.
Sun., Feb. 3, 4 p.m., 2008

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