Film » Film Capsules

Momma's Man

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When thirtysomething Mikey (Matt Boren) curls up in his bed in Momma’s Man, it’s like he’s returning to the womb. Since Mikey has just cancelled his return flight to L.A., where his wife and infant daughter await him, it’s a safe bet that retreating into the cocoon is what his extended visit with Mom and Dad (Flo and Ken Jacobs) is all about. The longer Mikey stays at his folks’ New York City loft, the more he regresses. He puts on a superhero cape from his childhood, picks up the guitar he hasn’t played since high school and even retrieves a break-up letter from an old girlfriend that reignites long-suppressed emotions. As Mikey strums his guitar in the middle of the night (an original composition goes something like, “Fuck, fuck, fuck, fuck you; I hope you die, too”), the look on his parents’ faces as they lay in bed listening to his impromptu jam session is pricelessly funny. But writer-director Azazel Jacobs isn’t interested in making an Apatow-ian comedy about boy-men in a state of arrested development. Instead, Jacobs, who cast his own parents as Mikey’s mother and father, is more interested in a sort of billet-doux to parents in general, and to the lingering shadows they leave on the lives of their progeny. Cleveland Museum of Art Lecture Hall. At 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 30. HHH

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