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TOP PICK – DVD

Superman: The Motion Picture Anthology (1978-2006)

(Warner)

This eight-disc, super-stuffed box includes all four Christopher Reeve movies as well as 2006's not-nearly-as-bad-as-you-think reboot Superman Returns. There's also a disc of bonus material, including the pilot for 1958's The Adventures of Superpup. Best of all are the two Blu-ray editions (theatrical and expanded) of the 1978 classic and the 1980 sequel, including original director Richard Donner's exemplary cut.

DVD

Old Dracula

(Twentieth Century Fox)

This 1975 curiosity stars David Niven as the bloodsucking count, hoping to resurrect his dead wife with female victims' blood. The best matches for her? Playboy bunnies, of course! Made after the success of Young Frankenstein, the movie (part of the MGM Limited Edition Collection) features plenty of mid-'70s British humor and half-naked women — sorta like Benny Hill with fangs.

TV

Rhett & Link: Commercial Kings

(IFC)

Based on a web series about two pals who travel the country to make hilarious commercials for local businesses, this new 10-part series (which premieres at 10 p.m. Friday) expands on the concept. Their clients — the black Da'Spot Hair Salon that wants to reach white customers, the Holiday Hotel for Cats — are ripe for parody, but Rhett and Link deliver the goods. But yeah, you'll laugh a lot too.

CD

Vieux Farka Touré: The Secret

(Six Degrees)

The son of the late Malian guitarist Ali Farka Touré gets ready for his big break on this album featuring guest spots from Derek Trucks, Jon Scofield, and, best of all, South African native Dave Matthews, who reveals some deep soul on "All the Same," the record's best track. But most of The Secret gives way to the guitarists, who fuse tricky riffs to worldly beats and earthy rhythms.

CD

Loudon Wainwright III – 40 Odd Years

(Shout! Factory)

Before he started starring in Judd Apatow projects, Wainwright (father of singer-songwriters Rufus and Martha) was pegged a New Dylan. His only near-hit was a 1972 novelty song about a dead skunk. Why was he never bigger? Good question, since this four-disc career box proves he has plenty of great — and funny — songs stretching all the way back to 1970, when he really did sound like a new Dylan.

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