Medicine for Melancholy has its Cleveland premiere tonight

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For the past month, the Cleveland Museum of Art has hosted a program called "Friday Night First Runs." It features local premieres of movies that have previously bypassed Cleveland during their theatrical runs. Tonight at 7, it's offering a screening of 2008's Medicine for Melancholy, a film about a couple who fall in love one day while walking the streets of San Francisco. Here's our review of the film.

96da/1242678911-30medicine_xlarge1.jpg Medicine for Melancholy (US, 2008) Shot in digital video on the streets of San Francisco, the first feature by 29-year-old writer/director Barry Jenkins is an affecting, beautifully played African-American spin on Richard Linklater’s epochal Before Sunrise. After what they both assumed was just a one-night stand, urban hipster Micah (Daily Show correspondent Wyatt Cenac) and boho beauty Jo’ (Tracey Higgins) spend the day getting to know each other while taking a (mostly walking) tour of the city in all its funky, eclectic glory. Similar in affectless sensibility and no-frills, DIY style to the mumblecore school of indie cinema, Jenkins’ tiny jewel of a film is equally indebted to the French New Wave and early Spike Lee (particularly She’s Gotta Have It). *** (Milan Paurich)

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