Cleveland Council pushes lead paint suit

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Cleveland City Council has finally acknowledged the poisoning of thousands of children in its midst. But don't get too excited—your leaders aren't actually going to do anything about it. Monday night, Council passed a resolution—non-binding, of course—urging Mayor Frank Jackson to consider suing Sherwin-Williams and other companies that sold lead paint for decades after they discovered it was toxic to kids ("The Poison Kids," Aug. 16, 2006). Most other big cities in Ohio have already filed suit. Yet Cleveland, home to one of the highest rates of childhood lead poisoning in the country, has been holding out. Now time is running out. Friday is the last day to file if Cleveland wants to avoid major battles at the state level over whether such suits are even legal. ACORN, the community activist group, is pushing Jackson to make a decision fast. Since the Invisible Mayor tends to move slower than Dick Cheney's pacemaker, we're not holding our breath. Expect a major announcement some time around Labor Day. — Lisa Rab

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