Train kills kangaroo; Zoo crosses fingers for naked PETA demonstration

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A heroic zoo-keeper tried to save the kangaroo, but it died in Borat's arms, which was weird.
Tuesday was a dark day at the Metropark Zoo. A 1-year-old red kangaroo, just chillin’ on some train tracks, was rammed by the Boomerang Express, a 65-foot train that hauls people around the Australian Adventure section, which is just like the real Land Down Under, only the kangaroos are smaller and get killed by trains. The conductor, a seasonal employee on the job since March, said he didn’t see the approximately 3-foot, 25-pound marsupial, said zoo spokeswoman Sue Allen. Neither did a volunteer who was supposed to be acting as a spotter. Their apparent inattentiveness led to the kangaroo’s death. She was euthanized shortly after being hit. The conductor was fired and the volunteer was reassigned to a job that doesn't include the highly technical task of seeing things. The train has been running since 2000. There were four accidents prior to this one, but none were serious enough to cause death, Allen said. But the story doesn’t end there. It never does when PETA is around. Hit one kangaroo, that’s an accident. Hit two and it’s a pattern of cruelty, says PETA, which is still figuring out how it can incorporate naked chicks into its latest crusade. The animal rights group is calling the U.S. Department of Agriculture to launch a full investigation into the zoo. Meanwhile, the Boomerang Express remains inactive. Zoo officials decided to stop the ride until new measures were implemented to prevent any more senseless kangaroo deaths, including the construction of a 4-foot fence around the train tracks. -- T.K. Kim

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