Rolling Stone goes inside the studio for The Black Keys' new album

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In the latest issue of Rolling Stone – it’s got Jack Johnson’s sandy mug on the cover – writer Peter Relic takes us inside the Painesville studios where Akron blues-rockers The Black Keys ground out their new record, Attack and Release, with producer Danger Mouse. The album, Relic reports, was born out of an idea Danger Mouse had to team the Black Keys with the late Ike Turner:
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In early 2007, Danger Mouse began work on a comeback album by rock & roll pioneer Ike Turner. Danger enticed the Keys (”One of my favorite bands,” he says) to write some songs for the project. The Keys turned in demos for Turner to learn, but when sessions bogged down, the project was temporarily shelved. The band eventually decided to make the tunes the heart of its fifth album, and Danger Mouse was the natural choice as producer. “Even when we gave the songs to Ike, they felt like Black Keys songs,” Auerbach says.
The album comes out April 1. The Keys start touring next month, including a stop at a South by Southwest party thrown by Scene and its sister papers. – Joe P. Tone

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