REED BETWEEN THE LINES

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Finally, at 6 p.m. tonight (Thursday), Cleveland Councilman Zack Reed will announce his decision on which of three ward races he’ll beat street for this year, now that his Mt. Pleasant Ward 3 is being carved to pulp in Council President Marty Sweeney’s redistricting shuffle.

At Holy Trinity Baptist Church, at 131st Street off Union, Reed undoubtedly will get all evangelical about his quest to keep serving constituents. Earlier in the day, he wouldn’t even hint at his choice.

“I can tell you this: Up until a few hours ago, we didn’t even know,” he said. “My campaign committee was tied three-to-three, and we finally just came to a consensus that we have to make a decision.”

Over in Old Brooklyn, another deposed Sweeney naysayer, Ward 15 Councilman Brian Cummins, announced last week that he’ll try to circumvent the dueling Hispanic candidates in Clark-Metro — embattled incumbent Joe Santiago and his almost-as-embattled predecessor, Nelson Cintron.

Cummins and Reed wouldn’t admit it, but we’ve heard tell of a Sweeney dart board having been erected somewhere in a secluded City Hall cranny. Sweeney’d better hope to rid the place of these two because he’s got some big guns coming in (read: Jeff Johnson) to beef up the opposition. Could Council’s vocal minority become a majority? Only time — and money — will tell. — Dan Harkins

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