Morning Brew: Courteous Car Chase, Ohio Books, Stolen Street Signs, and the Week's Worst Parents

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Image results for boonies were subpar, so instead we present The Goonies.
  • Image results for 'boonies were subpar, so instead we present The Goonies.

Good morning, Cleveland. Here's some stuff to read while Manny Acta considers using you as a pitcher.

— An Ohio town has seen the sign for "Wildman Street" stolen one too many times. According to the AP:

Greene County Engineer Robert Geyer in southwest Ohio explains that the signs vanish too quickly, probably to decorate bedrooms, garages and dorm rooms. He said the unusually named road is "out in the boonies," making the signs easy to swipe.

In other news, County Engineers consider the phrase "out in the boonies" a technical term. (AP)

— A Cincinnati woman led police on a chase, which is illegal, but made sure to stop at all red lights during her attempted escape, which is legal though probably not especially helpful considering her previous illegal actions. (AP)

— There are just no words for the sick and depraved parents in this story.


Police in Ohio say an 8-month-old baby who died from multiple injuries appeared to have adult bite marks, including one on the leg.

A police report on the death of Caleb Durig says officers in Troy in western Ohio also found blood on the floor and the infant's crib. They went to the home Monday in response to a 911 call from parents Jason and Tara Durig, who said the boy was not breathing.

An autopsy found the baby died from multiple blunt force trauma. Detectives said in their report that they found many bruises and signs of possible strangulation, and that the child may have been dead for some time.



(Ohio.com)

— Publishing companies in South Carolina work on a surprisingly high number of books about Ohio. Ohioans are still unsure where South Carolina is located. (Dispatch)

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