Cleveland Man Talks About Surviving Gunshot to Head

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Jory Aebly was one of the two men shot execution-style near E. 12th by robbers back in 2009. His friend, Jeremy Pechanec, died. Aebly not only survived, but has enjoyed a miraculous recovery.

With the tragic shooting of Congresswoman Giffords, MSNBC talks to Aebly and others who have survived gunshots to the head.

Nearly two years after he was shot point-blank in the head, Jory Aebly has some advice for Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, who doctors say is just beginning to wake up after a bullet tore through her brain.

“You have to keep working, no matter how hard it is,” said Aebly, 27, of Cleveland.

The Cleveland Clinic laboratory technician is back at work and living on his own, less than 23 months after a robber attacked him and a friend after they left a co-worker’s birthday celebration. His friend, Jeremy Pechanec, 28, died, and Aebly suffered what doctors at first called a “nonsurvivable” injury that crossed both hemispheres of his brain and left bullet fragments lodged in his skull.

Aebly not only survived, he rebounded, slowly regaining full ability to see, speak, think and read. Doctors caution that recuperation can vary widely, but Aebly and other victims of gunshot wounds to the head say they’re proof that Giffords can recover from the Jan. 8 tragedy that left six dead and 13 wounded.

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