Med Mart Tenants Big on Furniture, Not So Much on Medical Technology

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Cleveland’s Medical Mart project, touted as the nation’s future showcase for cutting-edge health-care innovation, is coming along nicely — as long as you consider aromatherapy and comfortable office chairs to preside on the cutting edge.

During groundbreaking festivities last Friday, project developer MMPI shared a list of 58 companies planning to lease space when the building opens in 2013. One-third of them sell furniture or in some way make interior spaces more inviting. The news served as a convenient reminder that MMPI’s bread is buttered nationally by a bunch of furniture and interior design marts, not technology palaces.

Among the featured companies: six office furniture outlets and another six makers of medical furniture.
As for Northeast Ohio representation: There will be Aeroscena, a local firm promising to ease patient anxiety with waiting-room aromatherapy; Gleeson Construction of Chagrin Falls, for your custom-cabinetry needs; North Ridgeville’s RGI International, which specializes in designing exhibit booths; and Karen Skunta & Company, purveyors of logo and sign design.

The international contingent includes a Vancouver decorative architectural glass designer and an Irish hospital curtain manufacturer. Requests for comment from MMPI were unsuccessful.
Med Mart: It may not save any lives, but it’ll make sure you die in style. — Maude Campbell

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