Wall Street Trailblazer and Cleveland Native Muriel Siebert Dies at 80

by

comment

muriel-siebert-big.jpg

Muriel "Mickie" Siebert, the first woman to ever buy a seat on the New York Stock Exchange and to head one of the exchange's member firms, died on Saturday in Manhattan. The Cleveland native was 80.

The cause of death is said to be implications from cancer, the NYT reports.

Siebert was born in Cleveland in 1932 and attended Western Reserve University for two years. She later moved to New York City where she bought her seat on the exchange in 1967 after years of battling the sexist policies of the banks and of the exchange.

She was the only woman admitted to membership for nearly a decade. “For 10 years, it was 1,365 men and me,” Siebert once told the NYT.

In 1969, she founded Muriel Siebert & Company and became the first woman to own and operate a brokerage firm that was a member of the New York Stock Exchange.

During her 50+ year career, Siebert also served as the first woman Superintendent of Banking for New York State, transformed Muriel Siebert & Company into a discount brokerage firm, and personally saw to the installment of a ladies room on the 7th floor of the NYSE.

R.I.P. Mickie.

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Cleveland Scene. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Cleveland Scene, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at news@clevescene.com.

Cleveland Scene works for you, and your support is essential.

Our small but mighty local team works tirelessly to bring you high-quality, uncensored news and cultural coverage of Cleveland and beyond.

Unlike many newspapers, ours is free – and we'd like to keep it that way, because we believe, now more than ever, everyone deserves access to accurate, independent coverage of their community.

Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing pledge, your support helps keep Cleveland's true free press free.