Life In Prison For Woman Who Slowly Killed Fiance With Antifreeze

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It was seven years ago when Holly McFeeture slowly killed her fiance Matthew Podolak, the father of their two children. She had been putting antifreeze in his raspberry iced tea in their Archmere Avenue home in Old Brooklyn. On July 31, 2006, "Podolak went to the emergency room in extreme pain, disoriented, and vomiting," per the county prosecutor's office. "Podolak died later that day."

Today in the Cuyahoga County Court of Common Pleas, McFeeture was sentenced to life in prison, with the possibility of parole after 30 years, by judge Brian Corrigan. Last month, jurors found her guilty of killing Podolak (click here for videos, photos, and a good story by the Plain Dealer on that trial):

McFeeture had been a suspect since the January 2006 death of Podolak from what a pathologist concluded was intoxication by ethylene glycol, the active ingredient in antifreeze. But the 35-year-old mother and sometime bartender, was not charged until 2012, two years after the manner of Podolak's death was determined to be a homicide based on a tip that ruled out suicide or accidental death.

During the weeklong trial before Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Judge Brian Corrigan, prosecutors contended that McFeeture wanted out of her relationship with Podolak and began lacing his red rasberry iced tea with antifreeze over several weeks.

Here's today's story from the Plain Dealer on the sentencing.

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