Man Detained in North Korea for Six Months Returns Home

Today in Heartwarming Ohio News

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As a tourist back in April, Jeffrey Fowle left a Bible at a Pyongyang nightclub. Christian evangelism being wildly illegal in North Korea, Fowle was arrested and jailed for the next six months. Today, he arrived home after an abrupt release and flight out of that country.

Back home in West Carrollton (near Dayton), Fowle embraced his family with tears and joy. His three children weren't even aware that their father was coming home until he got off the plane early this morning. Check out the AP video embedded below.



"Jeff is home," said attorney Tim Tepe, relaying the family's message. "We would like to thank God for his hand of protection over Jeff these past six months, providing strength and peace for his family in his absence."

According to the Korean Central News Agency, Kim Jong Un took "into consideration the repeated requests of U.S. President Barack Obama" in releasing Fowle. Kenneth Bae and Mathew Miller remain the other two Americans still held in North Korea.





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