Here's How Cleveland Police Handled a BB Gun Incident in May

Spoiler: It Ended Very Differently Than In Tamir Rice's Case

by

20 comments
On May 21 of this year, Patrolman Aaron Reese responded to reports of a man pointing a rifle at cars on Superior Avenue near 86th Street, according to a news story published today. When he arrived and apprehended the suspect, he realized he was dealing with a child and that the weapon was just a BB gun.

Fox 8 ran this story today, reminding their audience of an incident that began with a response resembling the Nov. 22 call about 12-year-old Tamir Rice waving a gun around at Cudell Rec Center. The latter ended in tragedy; the former ended differently.
The officer brought the boy home to his parents, who didn’t know he had a gun. The boy was not criminally charged, but officers wanted to make sure the boy understood how dangerous his actions were, so he was ordered to write a letter letting them know what he learned.

“I was stupid to have a BB gun that looks real enough to may have been shot and killed by anyone who saw or carried a real gun,” the letter stated. “I was also stupid to walk down the main street with it. I should have just kept it with my brother’s friend and shouldn’t have touched it at all. Even though I was walking, I was thinking in my head what if I get caught also what if I get killed. I am sincerely sorry for having the gun.”
How about that.



Scene has formally requested the May 21 police report to look into the details of this incident. We'll update this story as needed.

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Cleveland Scene. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Cleveland Scene, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at news@clevescene.com.

Cleveland Scene works for you, and your support is essential.

Our small but mighty local team works tirelessly to bring you high-quality, uncensored news and cultural coverage of Cleveland and beyond.

Unlike many newspapers, ours is free – and we'd like to keep it that way, because we believe, now more than ever, everyone deserves access to accurate, independent coverage of their community.

Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing pledge, your support helps keep Cleveland's true free press free.