Enjoy a "Hallucinatory Trip Into a Man's Mind in the Moments Before Death" for Two Nights Only at the Transformer Station

by

comment
For two nights only, the Transformer Station in Ohio City/Hingetown will be screening Cleveland-based Kasumi’s latest video installation. SHOCKWAVES is described as, “A hallucinatory trip into a man’s subconscious mind in the moments before his death.” So, a totally uplifting experience best enjoyed while on a date or with family.

Kasumi is a professor of Photography at Cleveland Institute of Art, and an internationally renowned artist. For SHOCKWAVES, Kasumi utilized over 25,000 public domain film samples, dance choreography, animation and rotoscoped clips to explore the nature of memory and our collective consciousness.



"We are proud and excited to be the first museum venue to present SHOCKWAVES as part of our continuing effort to introduce new work by artists of international reputation,” says Transformer Station founder (and former Interim Director of the Cleveland Museum of Art) Fred Bidwell. “In our gallery space Kasumi's media installation will be a uniquely compelling and immersive experience."
Kasumi will be on hand for a reception on Sunday, Feb. 1 at 5 p.m. SHOCKWAVES will be screening continuously from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Admission is free and open to the public.

(Transformer Station) 1460 W. 29th St., 216-938-5429, transformerstation.org


We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Cleveland Scene. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Cleveland Scene, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at news@clevescene.com.

Cleveland Scene works for you, and your support is essential.

Our small but mighty local team works tirelessly to bring you high-quality, uncensored news and cultural coverage of Cleveland and beyond.

Unlike many newspapers, ours is free – and we'd like to keep it that way, because we believe, now more than ever, everyone deserves access to accurate, independent coverage of their community.

Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing pledge, your support helps keep Cleveland's true free press free.