8 Concerts to Catch This Weekend

Concert Preview

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Friday, March 6

Beachland’s 15th Anniversary Celebration with Echosmith


It’s not often than an indie pop band scores a hit as big as Echosmith’s “Cool Kids.” If you listen to commercial radio, you’ll hear the catchy single with soulful vocals from the band’s 2013 debut Talking Dreams in constant rotation. It gets played alongside songs from the likes of Taylor Swift and Sam Smith. Seventeen-year-old singer Sydney Sierota, who fronts the band of siblings, says she thinks the song’s sentiments about not fitting in still apply, even though the band’s now a household name. “We all have felt that desire to fit in,” she says via phone as the band drives to a show “somewhere in Texas.” “No matter how old you are or how much success you’ve had, everyone feels that need at some point. I think that’s why the song is so successful. The base of the song is real and it is a story from Echosmith. We might be talking about another boy and girl, but we’re really talking about ourselves. It’s about accepting yourself and being okay with who you are. People now ask if we’re cool now. But we relate to the song more as time goes on. We’re constantly reminding ourselves to be true to who we are.” The group has cut its musical teeth on the festival circuit, so tonight’s sold out club gig should be a winner. 8 p.m. Beachland Ballroom. (Jeff Niesel)


Juliana Hatfield Three

Juliana Hatfield resurrected the Juliana Hatfield Three for a long overdue second album, Whatever, My Love, which was released in mid-February. The sessions for the new album helped Hatfield to finally find a home for “If I Could,” the first single, which was a song that she had demoed several times in the past. Even if it took a couple of decades, Whatever, My Love is a welcome return to action for the group and Hatfield says that the album came together pretty easily. “It was surprisingly easy,” says Hatfield. “I was worried because we had not played together in over 20 years when I made the plans to make this album. We didn’t know how it would go. But I just took a chance and I gambled. When we got to the studio, I think we were all hoping that it would work and it did. It went more smoothly than I even imagined that it would.” Tonight's performance at the Music Box Supper Club will feature material from the new album and happily, a full album performance of Become What You Are as well.8 p.m., $20 ADV, $22 DOS. Music Box Supper Club. (Matt Wardlaw)

The Jack Fords

Since the guys in the band all have plenty of other obligations, completing the new album There It Is wasn't easy. "I have kids and a full-time job," says band leader Bobby Latina. "We're all busy. We play around town as much as we can. We would go in the studio when we could. It was like making [the Guns N' Roses album] Chinese Democracy." The band recorded with engineer Jon Guggenheim at his studio, C-Town Sound. "It was very relaxed," says Latina. "There were two sessions where we did all the basic tracks. That was back in 2012. Brent did vocals and we did guitar tracks. A year went by and we did another five songs. That was it." With its snarling vocals and restrained guitar riff, the title track to There It Is sounds like a cross between vintage Tom Petty and AC/DC, and "Getting Back" is a rowdy garage-rock tune with a good, greasy guitar riff. "'Take Some Time' is the most country song and it started as a soulful song," Latina explains. "For whatever reason, Brent started doing a country thing and it became a rockabilly song. Songs such as 'Getting Back' and 'New Cool' were ones we recorded on the first take. We were really striving to have some diversity on the album."9 p.m., $10. The Euclid Tavern. (Niesel)


Saturday, March 7

10,000 Cadillacs


This local trio’s roots go all the way back to 1998 when singer Jason (Jmann) Popson and drummer Steve (Skinny) Felton, both of Mushroomhead fame, put the band together. Now, the band also includes Michael (Jus Mic) Mahoney, one of the best rappers on the local circuit. The group is allegedly in the studio prepping a new album that’ll feature guests such as Krayzie Bone and Bizzy Bone of Bone Thugs ’n’ Harmony and Mawk from Hed P.E. 6 p.m., $12. Roc Bar. (Niesel)

The Church

Few bands survive the kind of upheaval that has characterized the career of the Church. Founded in Sydney in 1980, the band has had its ups (its biggest hit was 1988’s moody alternative rock ballad “Under the Milky Way”) and downs (founding guitarist Marty Willson-Piper left the band in 2013), but has somehow soldiered on. And now, with its 25th studio album, Further/Deeper, the band explores “uncharted sonic territories,” as it’s put in a press release. And that isn’t just empty hype. Right from the opening notes of the album’s first track, “The Vanishing Man,” the band offers up a kind of sonic density that suggests shoegazer but with definite pop sensibilities. New guitarist Ian Haug (formerly of Powderfinger) fits in perfectly and even helped write the songs as the band pounded them out during an eight-day recording session. Expect the live show to really rock. 9 p.m., $25. Grog Shop. (Niesel)

Beachland’s 15th Anniversary Celebration with Dave & Phil Alvin & the Guilty Ones

Back in 1979, brothers Dave and Phil Alvin started the Blasters, a roots rock group with a punk-y edge to its sound. Despite a Blasters’ reunion that took place about a decade ago, Dave and Phil went their separate ways, with Dave pursuing a solo career and Phil leading the Blasters onward. While we don’t know the specifics, we heard the two had a significant falling out. But after Phil had a near-death scare in 2012, the brothers put aside their differences to record the Grammy-nominated blues album Common Ground: DaveAlvin + Phil Alvin Play And Sing The Songs Of Big Bill Broonzy. Their first album together in 30 years, it features 12 songs that “capture a 30-year cross section of Broonzy’s canon, performed by the Alvins in their signature style of rollicking roots and stomping country blues.” 8:30 p.m., $25. Beachland Ballroom. (Niesel)

Deadiron CD Release

One of the top hard rock bands on the local circuit, Deadiron has been slowly gaining traction since releasing its full-length debut, Out of the Rust And Ruin, back in 2012. Now, the group is set to issue the follow-up, Into The Fray, which will be officially released worldwide on March 24 via Auburn Records. "We are proud to be hosting the CD release show of our new album Into the Fray at the Agora," says Deadiron guitarist Tyler Harvey in a press release. "The [show's] lineup offers some refreshing diversity, so we hope that everyone can enjoy a nice cross section of heavy music and comedy from the city. We also will be debuting new merchandise to celebrate as well." 6 p.m., $6. Agora. (Niesel)

Sunday, March 8

Lotus

There’s something iconic and American about images of wooden roller coasters. I’m a sucker for enticing album covers, and Lotus’ Gilded Age draws me in sweetly. Nostalgia comes to mind, and bassist Jesse Miller confirmed as much when we spoke with him recently. “With this album, I think it did kind of start out with a couple songs at first — ‘Let Me In,’ ‘The Oaks,’ and ‘Gilded Age’ had been written a little while before. We wanted to do this kind of vibe of hinting at something that’s not quite a party song, something that’s reaching for something else. Then we ended up writing a few more things that fit into that same vein.” Probably the best song on the album, “The Oaks” dances between ebullient, almost Middle Eastern sounds and a central section that features open space, flourishes of synth and a hypnotic guitar line. 8 p.m., $22 ADV, $25 DOS. House of Blues. (Sandy)

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