Entertainment District Open-Container Bill Signed by Governor: UPDATE

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Gov. John Kasich signed the legislature's open-container bill this week, opening the door to more liberal booze policies in certain "entertainment districts" around the state. Cleveland, no doubt, will play host to a few.

The law is effective immediately.



Stay tuned for more as the city of Cleveland and Cuyahoga County begin studying how best to implement the new open-container zones here in town. 

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Originally published April 13



There's been talk for some time now of an open-container law that would allow revelers in certain "entertainment districts" to carry their Orange Whips out onto the street. With recent passage in the Ohio House and an impending vote in the Senate, we're getting closer to that reality.

The law would be capped at two entertainment districts per city of 50,000 or more (this would include Cleveland, Lakewood and Parma, locally). Cities with at least 35,000 residents would be allowed one area. 

Were the bill to be signed into law, it would fall to the cities themselves to implement it or not.

The E.W. Scripps School of Journalism Statehouse News Bureau reports that "lawmakers representing Greater Cincinnati are trying to push the bill through the legislature in time for the 2015 MLB All-Star Game, which the city will host."

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