Cleveland State University to Buy President a House Because His Apartment at the 9 Is Too Small for Entertaining

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PHOTO COURTESY TWITTER
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The president of Cleveland State University is moving again, this time because his residence at The 9, paid for by CSU, is too small for entertaining. (It was plenty for Johnny, so we don't see how Berkman was having issues, but whatever.)

President Ronald Berkman's current address at The 9 runs $3,600 a month for a two-bedroom unit. In addition to rent, Cleveland State University also hired an interior decorator for the unit for $6,000 prior to moving in. The expenditures proved costlier than expected after adding parking fees for guests, food orders, and space large enough to cater to large groups. 



Prior to Berkman's stay at the 9, which has lasted about a year and a half, he lived in a four-bedroom joint in Shaker Heights. 
Via Karen Farkas at Cleveland.com's report:

The university's foundation had bought a four-bedroom, Georgian-style house in Shaker Heights in June 2009 for $808,000 and leased it to the university.

The university invested a total of more than $1.2 million in the house, in addition to paying the foundation about $80,000 a year to cover the lease and about $24,000 in property taxes.

The foundation sold the house for $808,000.

No word yet on where Berkman will be living next.


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