Here's What Sherrod Brown and Rob Portman Have Said About the House's Healthcare Vote as Senate Takes Up the AHCA

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[image-1]As you probably know by now, the House passed the AHCA yesterday, which would repeal large swaths of Obamacare. Its highly contentious and problematic policies — regarding Medicaid expansion and pre-existing conditions, to name just two — as well as the long-term prospect of millions of Americans losing coverage, will now be taken up by the Senate.

Here's what Sherrod Brown and Rob Portman had to say in press releases after yesterday's vote. Spoiler: Neither one is a fan.



Brown: “I agree with Governor Kasich: we cannot allow Washington politicians with taxpayer-funded health insurance to rip coverage away from Ohioans who are battling cancer, getting regular checkups for the first time or finally getting treatment for their opioid addiction,” said Brown. “This bill threatens the healthcare coverage of nearly 1 million Ohioans, including 200,000 currently battling addiction, and allows companies to jack up prices on people with preexisting conditions like asthma and diabetes. This bill is heartless, it is bad for Ohio, and it will leave real Ohioans struggling to afford care. Instead of taking care away, we should be working to reduce the price of prescription drugs and improve care for everyone.”

Portman: “The status quo on health care is unsustainable. Premiums and deductibles continue their steep climb, and the skyrocketing cost of health care is hurting Ohio families and small businesses. There’s only one insurance company in more than one third of Ohio counties, which is leaving Ohioans with fewer choices and higher costs. Congress must take responsible action that lowers health care costs, but these changes must be made in a way that does not leave people behind.



“I’ve already made clear that I don’t support the House bill as currently constructed because I continue to have concerns that this bill does not do enough to protect Ohio's Medicaid expansion population, especially those who are receiving treatment for heroin and prescription drug abuse. We have an opioid crisis in this country, and I’m going to continue to work with my colleagues on solutions that ensure that those who are impacted by this epidemic can continue to receive treatment.”

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