Salt Fork State Park Removes Painting Of Confederate General

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The Salt Fork State Park lodge. - PHOTO VIA OHIO STATE PARKS
  • Photo via Ohio State Parks
  • The Salt Fork State Park lodge.
Salt Fork State Park recently removed a painting of Confederate General John Morgan from their lodge's dining hall. The painting portrays the Alabama general during a Southern Ohio raid in 1863, swinging his sword high preparing to fight.

"In light of recent events, we made the decision to remove the painting," park spokesman Matt Eiselstein told cleveland.com. "The canvas was safely taken down from the wall and is currently being safely stored."



Several institutions across the country have also taken action to remove Confederate materials, including the University of Texas and Duke University. These motions were sparked by recent violence in Charlottesville, after a white nationalist rally ended in devastation and one death.

This particular painting from the Civil War commemorates 'Morgan's Raid,' when Gen. Morgan led 2,500 troops through Ohio and was stopped in Columbiana County. Cambridge, the location of Salt Fork State Park, played a role in imprisoning captured Confederate soldiers.



Ohio has roughly 300 Civil War monuments, though less than six of these honor the Confederate army.

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