Indians Welcome Tonight's First Pitch From Girl with 3D-Printed Hand

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Eight-year-old Hailey Dawson is throwing out the first pitch at tonight's Cleveland Indians game against the Houston Astros, continuing her goal of tossing out the starting ceremonial pitch at all 30 MLB ballparks. And she's doing it with the help of a 3D-printed hand.

Born with Poland Syndrome, which means she's missing most fingers on one of her hands and has underdeveloped pectoral muscles, she also has a fiery passion for baseball. Thanks to a 3D-printed hand from the University of Las Vegas Nevada College of Engineering, and an inspiring attitude of, “if I can do it, you can do it,” Dawson is heading to an MLB mound for the eighth time on her first pitch tour. (We found out about the Tribe’s enthusiasm to host Dawson last September.)

The college prints a new hand for each first pitch, specialized with the teams’ colors and logos. Dawson’s mom, Yong, told Fox 8 News she hopes her daughter’s traveling all over the country to throw first pitches will raise awareness of Poland Syndrome, show how children can get cost-effective solutions with 3D-printed prosthetics and inspire others.

To learn more about Dawson’s journey, watch this video.


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