5 Concerts to Catch in Cleveland This Weekend

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FRIDAY, SEPT. 28

Brett Eldredge/Devin Dawson




When country singer Brett Eldredge opened for Luke Bryan at Progressive Field last summer, he successfully won the audience over with his 45-minute set that featured hits such as “Superhero” and the poppy “Love Someone,” a tune the benefited from the exuberant “uh-huhs” in its chorus. His spot-on cover of Train’s “Drops of Jupiter” showed off his sharp pop sensibilities. Expect to hear these songs and more when he performs tonight at Jacobs Pavilion at Nautica. (Jeff Niesel) 7:30 p.m., $80.13. Jacobs Pavilion.

Sinatra Night with Michael Sonata



Canton native Michael Sonata has always been involved in plays and choirs and was a member of the University of Notre Dame Glee Club. In 2004, he auditioned for a role in a Sopranos spoof that required a character based on Frank Sinatra. Sonata got the part and has been imitating Ol’ Blue Eyes ever since. He includes some 90 songs in his repertoire and covers all eras, including the Columbia years and the Capitol years. He even takes requests from the audience. (Niesel) 8 p.m., $10. Music Box Supper Club.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 29

Modest Mouse


Earlier this year, Modest Mouse played a sold out show at the Agora and it returns to town tonight to play the Akron Civic. The band is still touring behind its most recent album, Strangers to Ourselves, which was released all the way back in 2015, but rest assured that fans are looking to hear those good old hits from 2004's Good News For People Who Love Bad News won't be disappointed — not that the band is guaranteed to play them at all. No matter what gets played tonight, the band is sure to keep the crowd movin' and shouting along with frontman Isaac Brock's lifegiving vocals. (Laura Morrison), 8 p.m. Akron Civic Theatre.

Eddie Money

Classic rocker Eddie Money has had his ups and downs since his popularity peaked in the ’80s. After battling drug addiction in the early ’80s, he rebounded in the late ’80s to deliver hits such as “Walk on Water” and “Peace in our Time.” Since then, he’s continued to release albums with some regularity, though he hasn’t had anything resembling a hit in over 20 years. He tends to find an appreciative audience here in Northeast Ohio, where he was embraced before the rest of the country went wild for his blue collar ballads. (Niesel), 8 p.m. Hard Rock Rocksino Northfield Park.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 30

The Dreemers


Pay no attention to this Akron act's misnomer of a name. This isn't some dreamy, hippie bullshit group; instead, the Dreemers are one of the most raucous and riotous bands around. As the group told Scene late last year, "We'll have a punkier song or a bluesier song and then throw some kind of riff at the end, and it will go into doo-wop or some other genre. We just jam a lot and when we do that we blend styles together." All of those styles can be heard on the group's debut album Beach Mode, which is by far one of the most fun locally released records of the last year or so. The three-piece, together since 2015, could easily roll into schtick territory with its mix of vintage sounds and over-the-top personas, but it somehow manages to keep it fresh and in the now. (Morrison) 7:30 p.m., free. Music Box Supper Club.

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