7 Concerts to Catch in Cleveland This Weekend

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PAUL NATKIN
  • Paul Natkin
FRIDAY, APRIL 5

Ronnie Baker Brooks/Tommy Castro & the Painkillers


Singer-guitarist Ronnie Baker Brooks released Times Have Changed, his latest solo record, and his first in a decade, in 2017. Brooks first began working on songs in 2010 and got a significant boost when he connected with producer/drummer Steve Jordan, who brought important guidance to the project. Even though there were delays, Brooks says that once they finally got into the studio, they knocked things out for the record quickly. He admits that working with Jordan was something he initially found to be a little bit daunting, but the longtime producer helped ease his nerves quickly and encouraged Brooks to pursue recording a mix of his own material and a carefully chosen selection of covers. But he also was able to convince Brooks to let his guard down and embrace the talent and extra help that was in the room. Expert to hear songs from it at tonight's show. (Matt Wardlaw) 8 p.m., $25 ADV, $30 DOS. Music Box Supper Club.

2019 Lottery League Showcase Fundraiser and Pre-Draft Party with Queen of Hell/HIRAM-MAXIM/cotton ponys/Harvey Pekar/Public Squares/Forager/Cheap Clone/Halloween Candy



Self-described as “part rock n’ roll circus, part game show, part city-wide art project,” the Lottery League, an event that pairs together local musicians who've never played together before, is now in its fifth season. Changes to this year's incarnation include a VIP Sessions experience that’ll allow fans behind-the-scenes access and a collaboration with Ingenuity Labs and the Hamilton Collaborative. The event’s BIG SHOW will take place in the Hamilton’s warehouse space. The festivities kick off with tonight's Showcase Fundraiser/Pre-Draft Party at the Beachland Ballroom and Tavern. Several bands that formed out of previous Lottery League events will perform. A "draft" of this year's participants takes place tomorrow night at the Beachland. (Niesel), 7:30 p.m., $10 ADV, $12 DOS. Beachland Ballroom.

J Mascis/Herzog

Best known as the singer-guitarist who fronts Dinosaur Jr., J. Mascis started issuing solo albums in 2000. His latest effort, Elastic Days, is another winner. Intense guitar solos rip through tracks such as “See You at the Movies” and "Web So Dense," once again confirming what a prodigious talent Mascis is. His acoustic guitar playing on tunes such as "Sky is All We Had" and "Wanted You Around" is just as masterful. Expect him to put his chops on display at tonight's show. (Niesel) 9 p.m., $25 ADV, $28 DOS. Grog Shop.

Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes/Adam Ezra

A Cleveland favorite, Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes took a trip to the past on 2012’s Men Without Women: Live 7-2-11. Though it’s a live recording of a show he played just a few years ago, the record features Southside and the Asbury Jukes performing songs from Little Steven’s 1982 album. Longtime friends with both Steven (a founding member of the Jukes) and Bruce Springsteen, Southside Johnny has released more than 30 albums in a career that stretches back to the early '70s. Southside Johnny has fond memories of the days when Kid Leo put him into the regular rotation on WMMS and always puts on an especially good show in Cleveland. (Niesel) 8 p.m., $29.50-$37.50. MGM Northfield Park.

SATURDAY, APRIL 6

Mott the Hoople '74


Earlier this year, British rockers Mott the Hoople announced the details for their first U.S. in 45 years. The jaunt will feature the band’s core members — Ian Hunter, Ariel Bender and Morgan Fisher — and it celebrates the 45th anniversary of the band's famous 1974 U.S. tour as well as the original release of The Hoople and Live, the final albums of the classic Mott the Hoople era. The eight-date run of theaters includes tonight’s show at the Masonic Auditorium. The veteran alternative rock act the Dream Syndicate will open the show. (Niesel) 8 p.m., $39.50-$99.50. Masonic Auditorium.

SUNDAY, APRIL 7

Huntertones/Acid Cats


Taking the name from a street he used to live on, Jon Lampley christened the Huntertones a few years ago, and the band’s now evolved into something of a force. Members have collaborated with artists such as Ricky Martin, Allen Stone, Phillip Phillips, Jon Batiste, Snarky Puppy, Red Baraat, Eric Krasno, Fred Wesley, Rashawn Ross and Lena Hall. They’ve jammed with ensembles such as the Glenn Miller Orchestra, Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey, the Columbus Jazz Orchestra and the Cleveland Jazz Orchestra. Lampley has even had a few guest spots with the band playing on Stephen Colbert’s late-night show. (Niesel) 8 p.m., $10 ADV, $12 DOS. Beachland Tavern.

Soja/Passafire/Iya Terra

Arlington, VA seems like an unlikely place for a reggae band to prosper. And yet, that’s where SOJA formed some 20 years. The band would emerge to become one of the most popular U.S.-based reggae acts. The band would ink a deal with ATO Records, a label that Dave Matthews founded. The band’s popularity quickly went up a notch as a result. As much as the group’s profile has risen with each album and tour, the band sought to return to its roots for its latest effort, 2017’s Poetry in Motion. With their spirited horn arrangements and uptempo melodies, Poetry in Motion tunes such as “Moving Stones,”“I Can’t Stop Dreaming” and “Tried My Best” should help the band achieve that goal. (Niesel), 8 p.m., $26-$36. House of Blues.

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