This Year's Ohio State Fair Butter Sculpture Pays Tribute to 50th Anniversary of Moon Landing

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COURTESY OF THE AMERICAN DAIRY ASSOCIATION MIDEAST
  • Courtesy of the American Dairy Association Mideast
Sculpted from more than 2,200 pounds of butter in a span of 500 hours, this year's Ohio State Fair dairy-filled sculpture truly reflects the gravity of its theme — the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.

Older than the moon landing itself, this Ohio State Fair tradition has been around since 1903 when the first butter cow was sculpted. Past sculptures have included the Liberty Bell, Darth Vadar, and the Cleveland-based film A Christmas Story. According to the Ohio State Fair, themes are chosen to celebrate the buckeye state's ideals and cultural trends.



“Those who remember the moon landing often recall exactly where they were and how they felt, and the 50th anniversary is the perfect time to pay tribute to this amazing event and share that excitement with a new generation,” Jenny Hubble of the American Dairy Association said in a press release. “Ohio also has a special connection to that day, as one of our own took the first-ever steps on the surface of the moon.”

The Ohio connection comes from Neil Armstrong, who — if you didn't know — was a native of Wapakoneta, Ohio. Along with the traditional cow and calf, this year's sculpture captures a suited-up Armstrong saluting the American flag, a larger-than-life Apollo 11 patch and a second Armstrong, this time alongside fellow astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins.



You can see the sculpture in the Dairy Products Building at the Ohio Expo Center and State Fairgrounds in Columbus starting tomorrow through Aug. 4, the entire length of this year's Ohio State Fair.   

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