Cleveland POPS Does Pop Hits From the '70s and '80s and the Rest of the Classical Music to Catch This Week

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PHOTO BY ROGER MASTROIANNI, COURTESY OF THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA
  • Photo by Roger Mastroianni, Courtesy of The Cleveland Orchestra

Updated classics performed by CityMusic Cleveland and the Contemporary Youth Orchestra top this week’s list of varied events.

Jazz bassist and composer John Clayton is the central attraction in four concerts around town by CityMusic Cleveland from March 11-14. His Home takes a fresh look at Dvořák’s Symphony No. 9 (“From the New World”) in programs led by Amit Peled that also include the original work, as well as jazz selections played by The Spirit of the Groove. Orlando Watson contributes spoken words at each of the free concerts at Kirtland’s Lakeland Community College (March 11, 7:30 pm), the Maltz Performing Arts Center, (March 12, 7:30 pm, live streamed here), Lakewood Congregational Church (March 13, 7:30 pm), and St. Stanislaus Shrine (March 14, 8:00 pm). Check our Concert Listings for details.

And Michael Bradford has reimagined Bernard Herrmann’s iconic scores for Alfred Hitchcock films in arrangements for full orchestra inspired by Trip-Hop, a fusion of hip-hop and electronica. Liza Grossman leads the Contemporary Youth Orchestra in “The Man Behind the Curtain” on Saturday, March 14 at 7:00 pm at Tri-C’s Metro Auditorium. Tickets here.

In honor of Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day, the University of Akron’s Kulas Concert Series presents Seraph Brass, featuring America’s top female brass players on Wednesday, March 11 at 7:30 pm in Guzzetta Recital Hall. That includes UA faculty trombonist Elisabeth Shafer. Tickets at the door.



Oberlin Opera Theater also has women on its radar. Mozart’s comical Così fan tutte opens in Hall Auditorium on Wednesday, March 11 at 7:30 pm for four performances directed by Jonathon Field and conducted by Christopher Larkin. The show repeats on March 13 and 14 at 7:30 pm and March 15 at 2:00 pm. Read a preview article here and book your tickets online.

Two organizations are going retro this week. In its next concert on March 13 at 8:00 pm in Severance Hall, Cleveland POPS will celebrate ‘70s and ‘80s pop, music made famous by Whitney Houston, Michael Jackson, Bruce Springsteen, and other stars of the era. Carl Topilow conducts (tickets here).

And the Maltz Performing Arts Center is hosting the Peacherine Ragtime Society Orchestra, who will add live orchestrations to the silent films Habeas Corpus (Laurel & Hardy), The Rink (Charlie Chaplin), and One Week (Buster Keaton). Andrew Greene directs on Sunday, March 15 at 5:00 pm. Tickets here.

Paraguayan guitarist Berta Rojas makes her debut on the Cleveland Classical Guitar Society Series at Plymouth Church on Saturday, March 14 at 7:30 pm. Her program features music from the Southern Hemisphere, especially works by fellow Paraguayan Agustín Barrios, but also includes rarely-performed British composer Lennox Berkeley’s Sonatina. Tickets are available online.

Contemporary music will be featured in Chagrin Falls on Sunday, March 15 at 3:00 pm as Chagrin Arts presents the No Exit new music ensemble in music by Christopher Stark, Buck McDaniel, Ladislav Kubík, Leo Ornstein, Krzysztof Penderecki, and Giacinto Scelsi at the Federated Church. You’ll need tickets.

For details of these and other classical concerts, see our Concert Listings page.

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