Ohio Death Row Inmate Tyrone Noling's Wrongful Conviction Contention Will Be Featured on HLN

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OHIO DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS
  • Ohio Department of Corrections

Tyrone Noling has steadfastly maintained his innocence since being convicted of the 1990 murders of Bearnhardt and Cora Hartig. The state's case was problematic from the start — no physical evidence tied Noling to the crime scene — and has only become spottier. He was largely convicted, in a 1993 trial, based on the testimony of his three co-defendants, all of whom have since recanted, and sentenced to death.

His battle for exoneration has bounced around the legal system for nearly three decades, with the most recent entry two years ago when the Ohio Supreme Court ruled against allowing new DNA testing on shell casings and ring boxes collected at the scene.



The Ohio Innocence Project has previously identified two possible alternate suspects from the case, and in-depth investigations from both Scene and the Plain Dealer have raised serious questions about the conviction.

Noling's case will be featured on the season premiere of HLN's Death Row Stories on April 19 on CNN.



“'The Lost Boy' tells the story of a former trouble-maker sitting on Ohio death row for killing an elderly couple, while a desperate team of journalists, attorneys, and former law enforcement make the case for his innocence," the press release teases.

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