Locally Produced ‘Big Bad B-Movie Show’ Debuts on Channel 43

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COURTESY OF 'THE BIG BAD B-MOVIE SHOW'
  • Courtesy of 'The Big Bad B-Movie Show'
Local comedian Zachariah Durr and local photographer, storyteller and actress Laura Wimbels have teamed up for The Big Bad B-Movie Show, a new weekly TV program that airs at 8 p.m. on Saturdays on Channel 43-WUAB.

Post-broadcast, the show will also stream on the Cleveland19 WOIO and CW 43 WUAB websites.



Durr, who served as a director and co-writer on the IFC comedy Food Party! for two seasons, and currently works at WOIO/WUAB as a video producer for the website CLE Weekend, has performed on bills with comics such as Reggie Watts, Tig Notaro and Dave Hill. He also co-hosts Keep Talking: A Storytelling Show at the Happy Dog, a monthly event that will return when it’s safe to do so.

A frequent contributor to the popular NPR radio show The Moth, Wimbels is a five-time Moth StorySlam winner. Her book Faces of Cleveland highlights well-known (and lesser-known!) Clevelanders.



The Big Bad B-Movie Show features a mix of "host bits, sketch comedy, movie facts and general chaos." Viewers can expect drop-in guests to the show, such as local comedians, business owners and celebs such as the Mummy and the Monkey, who host their own horror movie host show on Facebook.

"Think of our show like SNL, but with a movie — except we don't have a budget or a celebrity host, and we can't get any musical acts," Durr says in a press release, citing Vampira, Elvira and Cleveland's own Ghoulardi as inspirations. "But there will be a rubber spider."

Each episode's centerpiece is a handpicked vintage B-movie horror flick presented without commentary since the hosts "feel the movies are funny enough without them," as Durr puts it.

The program kicked off this past weekend with 1959's Attack of the Giant Leeches, a rubber-suit monster movie that was filmed in eight days.

Other films airing this season include Bucket of Blood, The Gorilla, The Hideous Sun Demon and The Devil Bat.

On the program, Durr and Wimbels portray Leopold and Lenora, two people who've been locked in the movie vault at WUAB for years with only bad B-movies to watch for entertainment.

"My mom told me when I was five years old, I saw Superhost on the WUAB Prize Movie show," Durr says. "He was dressed like a Superman with a red nose, and was introducing some rubber-suit monster movie. I turned to my mom and said, 'I want that job.' I never thought it would actually happen."

Wimbels has also been a fan of WUAB’s programming.

“[WUAB had the] best edited-for-TV horror movies on the weekends, along with the best reruns of syndicated shows," she says. "I fully credit my deep appreciation of old horror movies and classic television programs from growing up sans cable. While all of my peers were watching MTV and getting progressively cooler, I was wrapped up in Rod Serling and The Twilight Zone, which was fine by me. Ultimately, I want this show to make people smile, whether it's someone who grew up watching Cleveland's beloved movie hosts, someone younger who happens to tune in and winds up liking the absurdity they see, or someone who is completely new to b-movies and hosts."

Durr hopes it finds a wide audience.

"It's great to produce a local Cleveland show," he says. "I hope we can bring back a style of TV that brings back memories for older viewers and be engaging enough for younger ones."

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