Feds Seize $441,000 of Counterfeit Sports Championship Rings in Ohio

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The counterfeit haul - CBP
  • CBP
  • The counterfeit haul

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Cincinnati recently seized a total of $441,000 worth of fake sports championship rings.

CBP says in a press release that the rings were found in three separate shipments. Two shipments were seized Oct. 5, with 94 rings coming from Singapore and United Arad Emirates.



Officials say these “poor-quality rings” would have been worth $141,000 had they been real. They add that the rings were an assortment of “Pittsburgh Penguin Championship rings, Los Angeles Dodgers, and Washington Nationals diamond rings,” according to the release.

On Oct. 13, officers seized a much larger shipment of 200 Los Angeles Dodgers rings from Saudi Arabia. They say this haul would have been worth $300,000 if genuine. This shipment was headed to “private residences in California, Pennsylvania, and Colorado," CBP adds.



“Sports fans often pay big money for sports memorabilia,” said LaFonda Sutton-Burke, director of field operations in Chicago. “But counterfeit sports memorabilia de-funds our sports organizations, funds criminal networks, and scams the fans. Officers in Cincinnati work hard each day to protect our domestic businesses and American consumers.”

Customs and Border Protection warns consumers to be wary of third-party websites selling anything — especially expensive memorabilia — at suspiciously low prices.

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